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Scalar just got widgetized!

Scalar’s Grid Visualization Widget.

For those who have used our Google Map, Timeline, Media Carousel or Visualization layouts and thought to yourself “I’d love to have these interactive components smaller, further down the page and I’d like to reference them in my text just like I do with media”…we have a new feature for you: Scalar Widgets.

Generously funded by the NEH’s Office of Digital Humanities, widgets constitute our most substantial interface upgrade since the release of Scalar 2. Widgets allow one to add maps, timelines, visualizations, click-through media galleries, and stylish summaries of related content to Scalar pages using the same formatting options as with media. One can add each of these interactive components anywhere on a page; above, below or within any paragraph. One an also choose to link a widget to text in the main body, that is, to reference a map or timeline the same way one would reference an image or video in Scalar.
 
Click below to the each of our new widgets in action in our User’s Guide.

Map Widget
Timeline Widget

Visualization Widget
Carousel Widget

Card Widget
Summary Widget


 
Just as with our layouts options, the maps, timelines, media carousels, visualizations and summaries all plot, arrange or otherwise display additional content from one’s Scalar project. So one can add a visualization of all the paths in a Scalar project just to the right of a paragraph discussing how best to navigate its structure. One can analyze the geographic dimensions of a video collection just above a map that plots the entire series according to shot location. Or, instead of referencing and analyzing a single image of an object, one can reference a click-through media gallery containing multiple images (and video) of that objecr from contrasting angles or within varying contexts. 

Finally, we’ve not only widgetized the functionality of our most popular layouts we’ve also added some new features with our Card and Summary widgets. These two widgets allow one to insert descriptive sidebars or lists of items in a Scalar project. Both widgets display a thumbnail, description of, and link to those items with varying styles.

For step-by-step instructions see the new widgets in our User’s Guide.

We value your feedback as you begin to use these new features and would love to hear from you about the innovative ways you put them to use.

Digital Paxton

 
In 1763 armed settlers in the Paxton Township laid waste to an isolated, unarmed Indian settlement, murdering all its inhabitants, attacked the Lancaster jailhouse where refugees had taken shelter, and vowed to march all the way to Philadelphia. After being stopped in Germantown by a delegation led by Benjamin Franklin, critics and apologists of the “Paxton Boys” –including some of Pennsylvania’s preeminent figures- spent the next year battling in print over the events, and ultimately, over the authority of the colonial government.

The Paxton pamphlet war comprised more than one-fifth of the Pennsylvania colony’s total printed material in 1764. In 1957, historian John Raine Dunbar was the first to create a critical edition of the pamphlet war, The Paxton Papers. But Dunbar’s Papers now suffer from three limitations, according to the creators of a new digital edition: it’s dated, limited in scope, and not easily accessible. The Digital Paxton Project (digitalpaxton.org), a digital archive and critical edition of the pamphlet war composed in Scalar by Library Company Fellow Will Fenton, Doctoral Candidate at Fordham University, and Co-sponsored by the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, seeks to move past these limitations.

As a critical archive built in Scalar, Digital Paxton effectively pairs particular forms of scholarly contributions to particular affordances offered by the platform, including contextual entries (via tags), conceptual keyword essays (via paths), and transcriptions and translations of pamphlets (via image annotations). Digital Paxton makes available dozens of political cartoons, manuscripts, broadsides, pamphlets, and German-language translations of pamphlets related to the Paxton incident. Digital Paxton features more than 1600 free, open-source, print-quality (300 dpi) images courtesy of the American Philosophical Society, Haverford College Quaker and Special Collections, Historical Society of Pennsylvania, Library Company of Philadelphia, and the Moravian Archives of Bethlehem. It also makes available contributions from a number of specialists:  Jack Brubaker, Nicole Eustace (NYU), Michael Goode (Utah Valley University), Scott Paul Gordon (Lehigh University), Kevin Kenny (Boston College), Darvin L. Martin, James P. Myers, Jr. (Gettysburg College), and Judith Ridner (Mississippi State University).

A portion of Digital Paxton’s online archive can also be explored in person. If you’re in the Philadelphia area you can stop by Will Fenton’s pop-up exhibition at the Library Company of Philadelphia running from April 5th to May 5th, 2017. The exhibition will showcase more than two-dozen exemplary manuscripts, broadsides, pamphlets, and political cartoons from the Library Company, Historical Society of Pennsylvania, American Philosophical Society, and Haverford College Quaker and Special Collections. You can also access the digital companion to the pop-up exhibition at digitalpaxton.org/exhibition.

Follow Digital Paxton on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter.

 

Five-day Scalar workshop at HILT

This year’s Humanities Intensive Learning and Teaching (HILT) program is now open for registration and features an in-depth, 5-day course on Scalar. HILT is an annual training institute that includes comprehensive courses on Digital Humanities topics, methods, and platforms as well as keynotes, ignite talks, and local cultural heritage excursions. This year HILT will be held from June 5–9 at the very lovely University of Texas at Austin.

The HILT Scalar course, taught by our own Curtis Fletcher, is structured as a 5-day workshop for those who already have a Scalar project in mind and seek comprehensive training in the platform and in-depth support with editorial, technical and design decisions. The workshop will include basic, intermediate and advanced training sessions in Scalar, discussions of readings on multimodal scholarship, and both collaborative white-boarding sessions and one-on-one design meetings devoted to each project. The aim of the workshop is to help participants think through the conceptual, structural and technical aspects of their projects as well as the project’s relation to the emergent field of digital media and scholarship overall.

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The Alliance for Networking Visual Culture

The Alliance for Networking Visual Culture was created with the generous support of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.