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Scalar: Scheduled Server Migration

The ANVC team will be moving Scalar to a new state-of-the-art server environment on Tuesday, June 3rd between, roughly, 9am and noon (PDT). During this time, all Scalar books will be available to browse and read. However, we are asking authors to refrain from editing or managing their content during this time as changes might be lost. We will post a separate alert -both here and on Scalar- during the server migration and then a final alert when it’s safe for authors to edit again. We apologize for any inconvenience.

Metropolitan Museum of Art Collections Now Available in Scalar

Scalar authors now have access to nearly 400,000 images from the Metropolitan Museum of Art. The collection, released by the Met earlier this month, is part of their Open Access for Scholarly Content program. Images from the program are intended for students, educators, researchers, and creators of non-commercial content. Among the 394,323 images: works of Vincent Van Gogh, Claude Monet and Pablo Picasso among many others, as well as photographs of ancient European tapestries and pieces from the museum’s Egyptian, Islamic and Asian holdings.

This collection is fully searchable within Scalar, and both images and their associated metadata can be imported directly into a Scalar book. Similar to the behavior of all imported media in Scalar books, images from this Met collection, once imported, remain on the museum’s servers but are displayed in Scalar books next to their metadata (e.g. title and source). Locating the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s collection in Scalar’s author interface is easy; it can now be found listed under “Other archives” when importing media.

Northeastern Cluster Hire

The Northeastern University Libraries are pleased to announce a cluster of new positions as part of our growing research and development activities in the fields of digital humanities and digital libraries. The Libraries are undertaking an ambitious agenda in support of emerging digital humanities and quantitative social sciences research efforts at Northeastern. With the launch of a new digital repository service and an increasing number of major grant-funded projects, the Libraries are deeply engaged with the university’s research mission.

These positions will work as part of a team that includes the staff of the Digital Scholarship Group and Library Technical Services to develop and expand support for digital scholarship, digital repository services, discovery tools, and other critical library services. We are looking for technically confident, fast learners who are equally comfortable with collaborative development, thoughtful experimentation, and critical system support. Team members have opportunities to participate in grant-funded research, collaborate on cutting-edge digital scholarship projects, and lead the development of new tools and systems. If you are interested in exploring new ways that technology can support research in the humanities and social sciences, we would like very much to hear from you.

Applications will be reviewed as they are received; first consideration will go to those received by May 30, 2014.

To apply for these positions, and to view job grade and salary information, please visit:

https://neu.peopleadmin.com/postings

and search for jobs within the division of the Library. For questions and more information, please contact Julia Flanders, j.flanders@neu.edu.

XML Applications Developer

The XML Applications Developer develops and maintains XML applications in support of the Digital Scholarship Group (DSG) and faculty projects affiliated with the DSG, with major focus on the TEI Archiving, Publishing and Access Service (TAPAS) and the Women Writers Project. He or she provides programming and systems analysis for the design, development and documentation of complex research tools across a wide range of projects. The XML Applications Developer will be responsible for designing, developing, testing and deploying new technologies, tools and resources to extend and enhance digital content and services, developing application programming interfaces (APIs) to facilitate multiple submission and access pathways. He or she writes and/or modifies code and conducts quality assurance on code contributed by other developers, and performs related duties as necessary. He or she works collaboratively with library colleagues as well as colleagues in ITS and across campus, and participates in an ongoing evaluation of emerging academic and library technologies. This is a 2-year position with the possibility of extended funding.

Qualifications
• Bachelor’s degree and a minimum of 2-3 years of XML development experience.
• Demonstrably strong working knowledge of XML/XSL and Xquery.
• Ability to work in an API environment and experience developing REST-based services.
• Knowledge of RDF and linked data structures and applications.
• Strong analytical and problem solving skills and the ability to formulate options, develop, and recommend solutions.
• Creativity in problem solving to independently resolve numerous technical issues arising in a constantly changing work environment, and analytical skills and judgment to extrapolate from one situation to another and to make appropriate decisions in a dynamic work environment
• Demonstrated experience with Unix, Unix utilities, device handling, data storage, and basic UNIX administration.
• Strong understanding of information organization and retrieval technologies used to organize, store, and access digital content.
• Experience with programming best practices, including test-drive development and design patterns.
• Knowledge of current web development standards and cross platform compatibility and accessibility techniques.
• Experience with Open Source software.
• Excellent oral and written skills to communicate with technical and non-technical individuals and prepare project documentation to support training and best practices encoding guidelines
• Strong interpersonal skills; ability to work successfully in a collaborative environment.
• Experience with IT in a higher education setting desirable.
• Experience working on complex humanities data desirable

Library Web Developer

The Library Web Developer has responsibility for designing, programming, and/or adapting existing web tools to enhance the Library’s various web-based systems. This position develops customized and project-specific solutions in JavaScript, PHP/Perl, CSS and other related web technologies, as well as contributing to the development of other core services, such as the Digital Repository Service, faculty online publications, remote service systems, and the online catalog. He or she works collaboratively with library colleagues as well as colleagues in Information Technology Services and across campus, and participates in an ongoing evaluation of emerging academic and library technologies.

Qualifications
• Bachelor’s degree in Computer Science, Information Systems or a related field (or equivalent experience).
• Excellent knowledge of database-driven web development using PHP.
• Significant experience with front-end development (CSS, JavaScript, PHP, Perl, etc.).
• Significant experience with Drupal, including customization of Drupal modules preferred.
• Significant experience with front-end development — tools, techniques and workflow automation (using CSS and preprocessors, XHTML, JavaScript/JQuery, git/github, bootstrap responsive design framework, etc.).
• Knowledge of current web development standards and cross platform compatibility and accessibility techniques.
• Experience with Open Source software.
• Ability to work in an API environment and experience with SOAP and/or REST desirable.
• Excellent oral and written skills to communicate with technical and non-technical individuals and prepare project documentation to support training and best practices encoding guidelines
• Strong interpersonal skill; ability to work successfully in a collaborative environment.
• Ability to take initiative and meet deadlines.
• Experience with IT in a library or higher education setting desirable.

Web Applications Programmer

The Web Applications Programmer has responsibility for designing, programming, and/or adapting existing web tools to augment and enhance the Library’s various web-based systems. This position maintains key digital architecture in Drupal, WordPress, and Omeka, as well as contributing to the development of other core services, such as the Digital Repository Service, remote service systems, and the online catalog. He or she works collaboratively with library colleagues as well as colleagues in ITS and across campus, and participates in an ongoing evaluation of emerging academic and library technologies. This is a 2-year position with the possibility of extended funding.

Qualifications

• Bachelor’s degree in Computer Science, Information Systems or a related field (or equivalent experience).
• Excellent knowledge of database-driven web development using PHP.
• Significant experience with Drupal and WordPress, including customization of associated modules.
• Experience with Omeka preferred.
• Experience with front-end development (CSS, JavaScript, PHP, Perl, etc.).
• Experience with Git/Github and other web development and testing platforms
• Knowledge of current web development standards and cross platform compatibility and accessibility techniques.
• Experience with Open Source software.
• Ability to work in an API environment and experience with SOAP and/or REST desirable.
• Excellent oral and written skills to communicate with technical and non-technical individuals and prepare project documentation to support training and best practices encoding guidelines
• Strong interpersonal skill; ability to work successfully in a collaborative environment.
• Ability to take initiative and meet deadlines.
• Experience with IT in a library or higher education setting desirable.

Craig Dietrich + Duke’s PhD Lab in Digital Knowledge

ANVC’s Information Design Director and USC Media Arts + Practice Research Assistant Professor Craig Dietrich recently joined members of Duke’s PhD Lab in Digital Knowledge for a conversation about Scalar and the future of digital dissertations.

Read more.

Announcing Our Summer Schedule of Scalar Webinars

The Scalar development team will be offering a series of free online webinars this summer.

Our “Introduction to Scalar” webinars will cover basic features of the platform: a review of existing Scalar books and a hands-on introduction to paths, tags, annotations and importing media. Our “Intermediate Scalar” webinars will delve into more advanced topics including the effective use of visualizations, annotating with media and a primer on customizing appearances in Scalar.

Our summer schedule will include four dates:

Introduction to Scalar: May 29, 10am-12pm (PST)
Intermediate Scalar: June 19, 10am-12pm (PST)
Introduction to Scalar: July 10, 4pm-6pm (PST)
Intermediate Scalar: July 31, 4pm-6pm (PST)

Register now.

At HASTAC, Craig Dietrich Discusses Digital Publishing, Scalar, and the Semantic Web

ANVC Info Design Director and USC Media Arts + Practice Research Assistant Professor Craig Dietrich  recently sat down with the University of Maine’s John Bell for a detailed interview. In “Digital Scholarly Production and the Semantic Web,” published at HASTAC, Dietrich frames Scalar’s history involving Semantic Web technology and the Vectors Journal, the latter having published a number of scholarly multimedia projects that provided successful workflow examples during the development of Scalar:

Vectors projects, while not based on Semantic Web technology, have had a similar workflow.  Each Vectors project produced internally was a collaboration between designers, scholars, and technologists.  Some collaborations might extend for months or even a year.  Each project includes a custom user-facing interface and a custom database schema operating in the background.  Though I hadn’t become aware of RDF-based databases for most of my time with Vectors, we found ourselves duplicating many of the affordances of semantic data in a more traditional MySQL database environment. I developed a software named the “Dynamic Backend Generator” (DBG),  a lightweight application for interacting with a database.  Forshadowing our creation of Scalar, the DBG emphasizes and automatically establishes a user interface for creating relationships between content held across multiple database tables.  A scholar without much database experience, or myself as the architect of many of the database, could use the DBG as a canvas to enter the data for a project and establish a network of relationships between them.  While Vectors isn’t a platform per se (each project is custom), the DBG allowed the MySQL database to become a platform for relational thinking and writing.

Dietrich also details some of his personal endeavors in the community, comparing Scalar’s flattened hierarchy—a feature that facilitates complex relationships between disparate content—to his recently launched Tenants in Action (TIA) mobile app, citing a desire to facilitate enhanced voice for physical and digital community members alike:

As a template system, Scalar offers authors an opportunity to create rich-media scholarship with the ease of writing a blog. While I have seen a number of Scalar projects created by individual authors with good results, the platform can also function as an intermediary and facilitator between designers, technologists and scholars—collaborators with different backgrounds can come together around the common platform. The latter method has provided me with a great deal of access to campuses, classes, and colleague academics. For example, I often visit nearby UCLA to interact with faculty and students there working on digital publication projects. As my interests involve communication with communities (in this case, academic communities), this access has proved invaluable to my research. Seeing first-hand the beginnings of relational thinking that emerge from using Scalar is a transformative experience, not unlike experiencing a neighborhood resident holding the Tennants in Action app in their hand for the first time and seeing the agency that it can provide.

Visit the full article at http://www.hastac.org/blogs/belljo/2014/03/01/digital-scholarly-production-and-semantic-web-interview-craig-dietrich

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The Alliance for Networking Visual Culture

The Alliance for Networking Visual Culture was created with the generous support of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.